Monday 6 April

HOLY WEEK REFLECTIONS

Monday 6th April

Creator of the universe,
you made the world in beauty,
and restore all things in glory
through the victory of Jesus Christ.

We pray that, wherever your image is
still disfigured 
by poverty, sickness,
selfishness, war, and greed, 

the new creation in Jesus Christ
may appear 
in justice, love, and peace, 
to the glory of your name. 

Amen.


‘Life doesn’t have to be like this’. Have you ever felt that? What did you do to change things? Is human life guided by fate, or choice?

Most of us, it is fair to say, would not have chosen a coronavirus lockdown. We would rather live life as usual, but fate, not choice, has intervened.

What we do with this time however is up to us. We could rage at the isolation, the lost jobs, the death of many before their time. Anger is reasonable. But we can also make this unchosen sabbatical a time for change – in how see each other, how we relate to neighbours, and what we really need in our lives compared to what is mere habit.

The Church of England’s Live Lent app this year has focused on care for creation. In some ways it has been overtaken by events, but in another, as the skies have cleared from pollution, our roads have cleared from traffic, and we have all enjoyed local wildlife on our daily walks, it is more relevant than ever.

We take the carbon-fuelled economy for granted, but life doesn’t have to be like this. Are we able to learn that we don’t need to drive everywhere, that we can enjoy local habitats rather than flying across the world, that we can live more simply and enjoy the pleasures of home cooking with locally-sourced produce?

The days between Palm Sunday and Maundy Thursday are a time for reflection – a train of events has been set in motion, but those events are not inevitable. Jesus’s followers could rise up in armed rebellion, or Jesus could at this late stage flee the scene. But as he reflects, and we reflect, he determines to walk a path of sacrificial love, which will lead to his death and resurrection.

One day we will leave our homes, we will come to church, we will visit pubs and restaurants, see our friends and family. But will we have the courage to be changed by what we have not chosen, and to live differently?

Martin Carr, Licensed Lay Minister